Using Artefactual Field Experiments to Learn about the Incentives for Sustainable Forest Use in Developing Economies

Using Artefactual Field Experiments to Learn about the Incentives for Sustainable Forest Use in Developing Economies

The authors describe in this paper the implementation of a public goods game and a social intervention modeled after a public goods game in rural Sierra Leone near the Gola Forest Reserve. They also collected demographic, economic and forest conservation data on households in the area. They use this data to assess the mapping of social preferences from the artefactual field experiment (AFE) into real world behavior. Through the paper they describe evidence of heterogeneity in shifting factors between the AFE, the field experiment, and conservation outcomes. They also find evidence that social controls like war violence and witchcraft may explain some of this correlation.

This paper was produced as one of the outputs from a CCI Collaborative Funded project A framework for assessing livelihood impacts of forest conservation programmes.

Suggested citation:
Voors, M. et al. (2011) Using Artefactual Field Experiments to Learn about the Incentives for Sustainable Forest Use in Developing Economies. American Economic Review 101: 329-333.

Collaboration / Project(s)

A framework for assessing livelihood impacts of forest conservation programmes

The importance of integrating the needs and livelihoods of local communities with biodiversity conservation efforts is now widely recognised as a key element for sustainable conservation solutions. The policy mechanisms through which to achieve this integration, however, have rarely been tested and remain poorly understood. This project aims to addresses this gap by developing a…