Potential impact of invasive alien species on ecosystem services provided by a tropical forested ecosystem: a case study from Montserrat

Potential impact of invasive alien species on ecosystem services provided by a tropical forested ecosystem: a case study from Montserrat

In this paper, published in Biological Invasions, the authors estimate the effect of feral livestock control on ecosystem services provided by Centre Hills reserve in Montserrat, to evaluate whether the biodiversity conservation rationale for continuation of the control programme is supported by an economic case. The Toolkit for Ecosystem Service Site-based Assessment was used to measure and compare ecosystem service provision between two states of the reserve (i.e. presence and absence of feral livestock control) to estimate the net consequences of the hunting programme on ecosystem services provided by the forest. Based on this the authors estimate that cessation of feral livestock management would substantially reduce the net benefits provided by the site, including a 46% reduction in nature-based tourism (from $419,000 to $228,000) and 36% reduction in harvested wild meat (from $205,000 to $132,000). The overall net benefit generated from annual ecosystem service flows associated with livestock control in the reserve, minus the management cost, was $214,000 per year. The authors conclude that continued feral livestock control is important for maintaining the current level of ecosystem services provided by the reserve.

This paper is an output of the CCI Collaborative Fund project Measuring and monitoring ecosystem services at the site scale: building practical tools for real-world conservation 

Peh, K. S.-H., Balmford, A., Birch, J. C., Brown, C., Butchart, S. H. M., Daley, J., … Bradbury, R. B. (2015). Potential impact of invasive alien species on ecosystem services provided by a tropical forested ecosystem: a case study from Montserrat. Biological Invasions, 17(1), 461–475. doi:10.1007/s10530-014-0743-9

Collaboration / Project(s)

Measuring and monitoring ecosystem services at the site scale: building practical tools for real-world conservation

This project aims to develop and deploy a rapid assessment tool to understand how far conserving sites for their biodiversity importance also helps to conserve different ecosystem services (ESs), relative to a converted state. The tool is being piloted at a diverse range of sites in the UK, Nepal and Montserrat. Publication of the methods…